English  ✓

Français

Some socio-economic and demographic determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania. A case study of Karagwe District

Girson L.K Ntimba, Ministry of Planning Economy and Empowerment, Tanzania
Maurice C.Y. Mbago, University of Dar es Salaam

Mortality is among demographic processes whose measures reflect the health status of population and in turn reflect the state of socioeconomic conditions in the country. This study examined some socio-economic and demographic determinants of infant and child mortality in Tanzania, a case study of Karagwe District.The study was undertaken in the month of October 2005 involving a sample of 88 mothers from urban and 112 from rural settings) in reproductive age 15-49 years. The analysis of data involved three levels: i) Univariate ii) Bivariate and iii) Multivariate analysis. Of all the independent variables tested in this study, employment status, children everborn and age of mother at first birth were found to be significant in influencing Infant and Child Mortality. Income of the mother and that of the household were not significant in influencing Infant and Child Mortality. Age of mother was not significant only in the multivariate analysis.

  See paper

Presented in Session 54: Trends and Determinants of Child Health and Mortality in sub-Saharan Africa