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Gender inequality, domestic violence and male partner characteristics as risk factors for HIV infection among women in Zimbabwe

William Sambisa, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sian Curtis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Current research trends on AIDS in Africa seek to integrate both sociocultural and structural explanations into a research paradigm that focuses on individual behavior. Since men are primarily responsible for increased transmission of HIV to women, it is essential to include their characteristics and risky behaviors as a context that increases women vulnerability to HIV. Not many studies in Africa have assessed gender inequality, domestic violence and male characteristics as risk factors for HIV among women. Using the 2005 Zimbabwe DHS couples data, the study explores the association between gender inequality, domestic violence, partner characteristics and sexual behaviors on the one hand, and women’s sexual behavior and HIV status on the other. Bivariate relationships between gender dynamics and sexual behavior of women and their partners will be examined. Multivariate analysis will explore the relative importance of gender dynamics on women’s sexual behavior and HIV status.

Presented in Session 43: Gender based violence: prevalence and consequences