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Food security and household vulnerability in a South African context of high HIV prevalence

Busisiwe Nkosi, Health Economics and AIDS Research Division (HEARD)
Mary Bachman DeSilva, Boston University

To document household-level food insecurity in a context of high HIV prevalence, and to determine whether it differed by whether a household has been affected by HIV/AIDS and other vulnerability factors, we used data from a longitudinal study in KwaZulu-Natal. Food insecurity was high in the cohort: 66% of households reported at least 1-2 days without adequate food in the previous month; 70% reported at least 1-2 months without adequate food in the previous year. Regarding extreme food insecurity, 19% reported >10 days without adequate food in the previous month; 20% reported five or more months without adequate food in the previous year. Orphan households were more likely to report severe food insecurity (23% reporting >10 days in previous month vs.16% for non-orphan households, p=0.0291). Households that reported severe food insecurity in the past month had substantially lower per capita annual income (South African Rand 901 vs. 2707, p<0.0001).

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Presented in Poster Session 3